LDS Temple Art - by B Laura Wilson

LDS Temple Art - by B Laura Wilson

www.ArtPal.com/kwilson0463

Buni Laura (Johnson) Wilson, is a graduate with a master’s degree of Fine Art from Brigham Young University, mother of 12 children, and has been a private, college and public-school art instructor. She spent many years painting in oils but has become a “died-in-the-wool” true lover of watercolors because of the influence of her neighbor and mentor, world class watercolor artist, Milford Zornes.. She loves the luminosity and transparent washes and easy cleanup of this medium. Laura, now that her children are grown, has turned from being a full-time mother to avid painter. Painting portraits, local Southern Utah landscapes, temples in watercolor and what she calls CTR children, have given her work a variety. She likes to frame her work with flowers and seeks to capture a nostalgic warmth in her paintings.

Why I paint warm and inviting -
"I remember as a young girl, sitting on my sunny back porch, with my knees pulled up under my long flannel night gown, early, before anyone else was up. The sun made me warm in the cool Spring air. Of all the days and years gone by, I remember that morning. I want to paint that feeling of warmth and security into my paintings.
I also feel the darkness of our times pushing in on us. Yet the temple and the home stand as refuge in the turmoil of our lives. I want my temples paintings to feel like that refuge, that place of safety, where the sun still makes you warm, a quiet place where you can own yourself for a moment. That is the time the Lord can comfort and teach you where you stand with him.
I like to paint with watercolors because they sit like a delicate flower floating on water, Humm, how to say that…like a butterfly, so light that it only tickles the paper. Watercolor is fresh and has to be caught the first time. It can’t be reworked. And it has to be done so the white of the paper is left to make the speckles of dappled light from the trees, and to give a painting the sparkly characteristic of water color paintings. The white paper is also important for a warm glow of color to show through from an under painting after transparent washes are painted over it.
I struggle to get it right. I struggle to paint often enough that what I learn to do, doesn’t have to be relearned again and again. I want to be useful with my art. Sometimes I feel guided and sometimes I am just stumbling along on my own. All the time, a finished work is its own reward."




Temples of the World



Southwest Land