ARTBYKERINFREEMAN

ARTBYKERINFREEMAN

www.ArtPal.com/kerf

Kerin Freeman is a Hauraki portrait artist of British heritage, having lived in New Zealand for just over thirty years. Here, she discusses her love of art, travel aspirations, the importance of family and friends, and of being an artist
The beginning of my career began many years ago when I was a child. My mother was very artistic and encouraged myself and my sister to read and draw from an early age. Nothing beat sitting at the dining table with paper or colouring-in books and crayons, or just a pencil in my hand. Seeing pictures come alive on the paper was exciting, reality disappeared and a new world began. That feeling never left me over the years when I pick up a pencil, mix colours, buy brushes or paints or canvases. The years have not always been affluent for me but whatever I was going through I made sure I had enough paint, paper, pencils or canvas. And books. I am obsessed with reading. I have designed children’s T-shirts for a clothing manufacturer, large billboards for a beauty company I worked for, entered art competitions and won awards.The best job I had was working as an animator for an animation company in New Zealand on Tiny Toons, directed by Steven Spielberg in America. The man who ran the art department in our company once worked for Walt Disney himself – so I thought who better to learn from and spent many a lunch break sitting in his office watching him as he worked.
My biggest influences:
Van Gogh - the vibrant landscapes, the way he used paint on canvas
Rembrandt - his paintings tell stories, they show people in various moods and in different situations in other centuries in great detail
Vermeer - The Girl With The Pearl Earring – his attention to detail and light
Pieter Brugel - great composition, I get a sense of the historic period of the time of people, what they wore, working the fields, the surrounding countryside, the seasons
Claude Monet – amazing use of colour and light, how he captured nature in its glory
Edward Hopper - his iconic Nighthawks - I love the realism of his work and use of light
Andy Warhol - he said that art shouldn’t be for the select few but for the mass of American people. Art should be available for everyone
Rene Magritte – the surrealism of his art, taking ordinary objects and people and adding fantasy
The perfect gift for me? A trip to France. I am British born and was very lucky to have lived in Belgium for 4yrs when I was in my 20s. I immediately fell in love with the country and, being so near other countries, we traveled to various European countries. I loved the aromatic smells wafting out from cafes, European history, architecture, the people, the French language – the food and chocolate, especially the chocolate, my downfall. Visiting Paris I became immediately captivated by the beauty of the city – its history and beautiful architecture and bridges – apart from loving art and books, I am mad keen on history. Underneath the Eiffel Tower I made a promise to myself that I would return – I am still waiting for a chance to do that. I think I must have been French in another life
What’s the best advice I've ever received? Follow your heart and do what you love. We didn’t have a lot of money when I was growing up and there was no time to indulge in my attending art college. I was sent to an all girls secretarial college and have spent many years working in various offices, and hated it. The time I did get to myself I painted, allowing me to tune out from everyday life. Now, I just paint. So yes, do what you love, whatever it is, and you’ll be happy



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