Tristan Bisaillon-Lefebvre

Tristan Bisaillon-Lefebvre

www.ArtPal.com/tristanbisaillon

As every little boy, I started to carve out little pieces of wood with my dad's super sharp knife. At that age, I didnt really knew that it would get me to a professional level. At the age of 17, I left home to complete an adventure tourism program over 3 years. This was a hard step of my life. I was moving completly on my own to live in Gaspé which is about a 14 hours drive from my home. That decision really helped me find out who I was and how I could be happy . That first big step really opened my mind to the woodworking world. Here's a little story that explains how I created my first wood craft.

Back in the time, I was following a canoe course and the final exam was a real 3 day expedition on the Cascapedia river. After a cold and rainy day, a hot soup was the only thing everyone was thinking about. As the supper was ready, one of our teachers noticed that he had forgotten his spoon. In about 5 minutes, he had shaped down a beautifull and functionnal spoon from a little piece of drift woood. I was simply amazed at how quick he carved out that spoon. That had certainly triggered something inside me. At that moment I became completly crazy about creating the perfect spoon. I ended up buying 3 straight chisels and some sand paper to create my first wood craft. I made a couple of practice pieces until I really had an idea how to make the most beautifull spoon. At that time, I was completly in love and I really wanted to give that girl the nicest gift possible. I chose a beautifull piece of rosewood to illustrate my love for her and I carved a big heart at the end of the spoon's handle. As I finished my spoon projects, I realized that the action of carving was a form of relieving mediation for me. I was so concentrated on my wooden spoon that I forgot all the rest. From that point, I started to realize that I could basically do any kind of wooden art objects. My hunger for carving was simply insatiable. I started to work on projects that were always harder to accomplish. Step by step I gained a considerable knowledge on wood carving techniques and traditionnal hand tools. Spoons, forks, axe handle, tobbaco pipes, cutting board, paddle, low relief moose antlers, live edge coffe table, wood spirits, hair pins.



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